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20121129
20121207
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Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)
countries that have no beliefs in civil liberties, countries who are terrible on human rights, and we say we're going to put you in charge of decisions -- >> that's not what it does. it forces them to live up to standards that we believe in. >> no, it doesn't. where does it say in there the other countries will live up to our standards? >> that's what the treaty does. it sets down standards. >> it does not say -- >> john, happy holidays. bob shrum -- >> -- giving away all our power. >> sometimes it comes down to how we look at the world. >>> republicans made no secret to keep democrats from voting. is it possible those voter i.d. laws, the photo i.d. laws, actually encouraged african-americans among others to defy the gop and go out and vote. i feel it happened. i have heard that happened. let's hear about it. did it happen? did blacks and others say screw you, you're not going to stop me from voting. let's find out how it worked. tonight, we host "the washington post" report and hear reporting of the university of notre dame that have caused serious claims. finally, what's the most iconic 2
states it increased, like ohio. some civil rights leaders say it was those attempts at voter suppression that drove voters out to vote even if it meant standing in line for hours. what is clear is the republican party has a deeper problem right now. it's failing to attract minority voters largely due to the policies and the rhetoric some of its leaders and their cronies have been using. what's going on? what can the republican party do about it? big questions. j.c. watts, former u.s. congressman from oklahoma. and judith browne dianis. thank you so much. let me ask judith to start with some homework that we couldn't do but we're counting on to you do. people come up to me and said, i was so angry about some of the suppression talk and attempts in those 30-some states. african-americans would say i got out there and i voted. what evidence do you have that it really worked in favor, or rather put it this way, against the republicans for trying to do that? >> well, number one, we know that they tried to do it so that they could have partisan advantage, but we do know it backfired because, n
leader and role model. he supported civil rights bills, refused to sign the southern manifesto in 19 of a an helped write the historical civil rights act. may we also remember congressman jack brooks. he was a great man, a political figure, a u.s. marine veteran and a friend that i'll never forget. thank you, mr. speaker. the speaker pro tempore: thank you. for what purpose does the gentleman from texas seek recognition? mr. poe: ask unanimous consent to address how it's for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. the gentleman is recognized for one minute. mr. poe: mr. speaker, starting at the age of 15, i worked any job i could find to support myself throughout college. manually dug ditches, construction work, plant work. after college i found an entry-level position in the field in which i sturdied. and with hard work i have constantly been employed for 36 years and now i'm near retirement. i've never requested or received any federal financial assistance. i enjoy contributing to my community and my church and this is my american dream. now this administration want
of civilization. it's stored right here. smiles make more smiles. when the chocolate is hershey's. life is delicious. >> jennifer: injureyou're back inside "the war room." i'm jennifer granholm. we have movies that matter series. i'll tell but a movie that is causing a buzz. it's called "chasing ice"." >> i never imagined you could sees glaciers disappearing in such a short time. the initial goal was to put out 25 cameras for three years. shoot every hour as long as it was daylight to show you how the landlandscape was changing. >> the landscape is gone and it may never be seen again in the history of civilization, and its stored right here. >> jennifer: the photographer is james balog and "chasing ice" is a wake-up call to the world that we need to get serious about chime change. he's joining us from denver. thanks for joining us. >> hello jennifer, great to join you. before you started making this movie in you 2005, you said that you were skeptical of chime change. has your point of view changed? >> honestly it was more like 20, 25 years ago when i thought that this whole story was ab
a person in custody and no further details about the case were available. >> the oscar a great civil rights case was back in court yesterday lawyers for his the state john burris and dan siegel argued the ruling against johannes mehswrle and the other two board officers involved in the incident leading to grants murder should not be overturned. a federal judge ruled in may 2011 that barred cannot be held legally response for the 2009 shooting death of foster grant at oakland's fourth fail bart station. the judge wrote a $50 million federal lawsuit against the former bart police officer should be decided in a trout. >> deficit gabor supplies is expected to make its final decision on the to dry banyan on nudity. plenty of people will be on hand today as a surprise meeting. and many will oppose the ban, a plan to strip down the meeting. it would not be the first time. last month the board initially approved the ban on nude with a narrow 65 vote. several people took off their clothes and protests. if the ban is finalized, it would take effect on february 1st. i was start on that-that at one und
historic laws including the civil rights act of 1964. what a life. jack brooks, dead at 89. bill: 25 minutes past the hour. there could soon be a major shortage of primary care doctors. the journal of the medical american association says 22% of internal medicine residents are planning to become internal medicine doctors. what does this mean to you? marc siegl joins us now with the latest on this. doctor, nice to see you. >> good to see you. bill: what does it mean. >> i want to explain to our views out there exactly what an internal medicine doctor is. we always talk about primary care. primary care is a pediatrician, obstetrician, gynecologist for women's health, family practitioner or a general internist, which is what i am. someone who does the internal organs of the pwaopbd say body and says i'm not going to become a lung specialist, i'm going to stay as a general doctor. you're sick, you're having high blood pressure, high cholesterol, i'm the guy you see. people need doctors like that. without doctors like that what are we going to do? there was another study two years ago, th
to be the chair of the judiciary committee subcommittee on constitution and human rights and civil rights. we've had a series of hearings on the issues of human rights and laws in the united states that affect them. i've also been honored to join with senator cardin of maryland, who chairs our helsinki commission senate delegation on several trips overseas where he's made human rights a major part of the agenda of that commission and of the united states. that's why one of the aspects of this bill before us is so important. sadly today in russia, country of russia we are seeing evidence of brutal, horrific treatment of individuals and abuses of human rights. senator cardin, whom i said earlier is a great voice on human rights in the senate, introduced legislation in this congress that would impose u.s. visa bans and asset freezes on those who commit gross human rights violations around the world. that was the cardin amendment, which i thought was a good one. the idea was just sefrp. those who -- just simple. those who commit such acts shouldn't be allowed to visit our country. period. this ca
more moderate. i would say that you were 100% right. there is a civil war going on among the leadership. remember, the leader used to brag about they didn't have leaders and what happened was they were hijacked by big money. that's what happened to the tea party. they are not the same tea party that you and i -- remember in that march when we walked past the demonstration on the lincoln memorial? that's not the same tea party that evolved. >> former congressman joe perriola and joe madison, thanks for coming on tonight. >> thanks. >>> protests pepper sprayed in michigan. the president just responded. big story tonight. >>> and a memo to the gop, when you've lost ann coulter on taxes, you know you're in trouble. stay with us. >>> we've told you how papa john's ceo is eating his words after criticizing the health care law. but he's not the only one. darden's restaurant which owns olive garden and red lobster and other chains says it will cut full-time hours so they wouldn't have to give them what was health insurance. they want service treated right and darden's anti-health care crab fest
and that the message will be clear to those who are violating civil rights so horrendously. and i yield the floor. i suggest the absence of a quorum. the presiding officer: the clerk will call the roll. quorum call: quorum call: the presiding officer: without objection, so ordered. under the previous order, the questions on amendment numbered 3254 offered by the senator from new hampshire. amendment numbered 3245. excuse me. the senator from new hampshire. is there a sufficient second? there appears to be. the clerk will call the roll. vote: vote: vote: the presiding officer: are there any senators in chambers wishing to vote or wishing to change their vote? if not, the yeas are 54, the nays are 41. the amendment is agreed to. mr. reid reid: move to reconsid. the presiding officer: the majority leader. mr. reid: mr. president? mr. president, could we have order. the presiding officer: will the chamber please come to order. may we have orderment -- order. the majority leader. mr. reid: mr. president, we have one more vote t. will take -- start in just a few minutes. senator levin wants to say somethi
of civilization, and its stored right here. >> jennifer: the photographer is james balog and "chasing ice" is a wake-up call to the world that we need to get serious about chime change. he's joining us from denver. thanks for joining us. >> hello jennifer, great to join you. before you started making this movie in you 2005, you said that you were skeptical of chime change. has your point of view changed? >> honestly it was more like 20, 25 years ago when i thought that this whole story was about computer modeling, which at the time was relatively primitive. i was wrong about that. the real story was about--the real evidence had-held in the ice cores up to antarctica to to arctic. once i took time to stop and understand the empirical evosed to my my misconceptions. i started this in the late 90s but it wasn't until 2005 when the ice work started get going that i got locked into the trajectory that became the movie and ice survey. >> jennifer: you're in position to provide other i am empirical evidence, which is what your film is about. what is happening with the film? do you think it's ch
that many church-goers have changed their views about gay civil rights is one of the most underreported reasons why same-sex marriage is now legal in nine states. it is also one of the reasons that the constitution of prop 8 which took away gay californians right to marry. may get a hearing. the announcement was to be today. probably friday. a majority of main line protestants and roman catholics now favor legalizing same-sex marriage. did you know that? i knew a majority of americans. i did not know a majority of protestants and catholics favor marriage equality. >> that's awesome. >> stephanie: i was quite interested. >> thank you. >> stephanie: so when other more conservative christian kin claim it is against the bible we beg to differ. they wrote this in the "l.a. times," we posted this up on steph stephanie miller facebook. there are only three passages that deal with homosexuality in the new testament. the passages don't deal with homosexuality but with temple prostitution and other abuses. i'm
with disabilities act, and what it has done to our society. like our civil rights act. what it's done to break down the barriers and to show that people with disabilities can contribute to society, if only given the chance and the opportunity. i would think that we would want for them to then say yes, we'll be a part of a worldwide effort to break down those barriers against people with disabilities we want be part of a worldwide effort that says it's not right, it's not okay, to leave a baby on the side of the road to die simply because that baby has down syndrome. you would think we would want to be part of an effort, a global effort that says it's not all right to keep kids out of school and away from education because they have a physical disability, they use a wheelchair. or an intellectual disability. you would think we would want to be part of an effort like that that says it is not okay to put people in cells, chained to cells, whose only crime is that they are disabled. you would think we would want to be part of that effort. we've done that in this country. we've done wonderful things. an
the civil rights act and the voting rights act and the americans with disabilities act, is still capable of voting to change things, let alone send a message that could change the world. i ask colleagues to do for the world what they've done for america -- walk down the aisle here and for millions everywhere who cannot walk make a stateme statement. raise your voice and vote for millions who are voiceless in their own lands. stand up for those who cannot stand up for themselves. this is not about the united nations. this is about common humanity. and this vote is to test whether the senate will stand up for those who cannot see or hear and whether senators can hear the truth and see the facts. please don't let captain brzynski down, please don't let senator bob dole down. most importantly, don't let the senate and the country down. approve this treaty. the presiding officer: the question occurs on the resolution of advice and consent to ratification of the convention on the rights of persons with disabilities. a senator: mr. president? i ask for the yeas and nays. the presiding officer:
judiciary, property law and human rights law, trying to expand civil society in ways that will make china flourish in the future. we are lucky to have you. three clique points i want to make before we move on, before we hear from professor alford, cohen and gewirtz. it is important to note that in the cycles of the u.s./china relationship we are entering an extraordinarily interesting period. i can't remember a time in recent history where we have had a president in an election but roughly coincided exactly with the leadership change in beijing. so what have we seen in beijing? in recent weeks, this very month. 2,000 delegates visiting beijing, putting together a slate of 370 committee members, chopping off 25 members of the politburo and some agreement around not 9 but 7 members of the standing committee of the politburo which i would refer to or considered to be the board of directors if it will end a reelected president on this side which is to say we are going to begin the new year with a clean slate and that ability which is so unusual in the u.s./china relationship to start fresh an
the leadership conference on civil and human rights, the wounded warrior project, the hindu american foundation the islamic center of -- society of north america, the jewish federations of america, the national catholic social justice lobby, and the veterans of foreign wars. let me share a couple of letters. bernard from franklin county in my state wrote, "i'm concerned about recent grumblings about former senator santorum and others. i was a lot of regard for the a.d.a. and a a wareness of discrimination against people with disabilities. when will the senate take up this u.n. resolution? what can i do to convince oppositional senators that this is an important and necessary resolution for people with disabilities, especially our nation's veterans? well, bernard, my colleagues on the other side of the aisle -- nor mccain, former majority leader bob dole, both of whom served our country honorably in the armed forces, and 21 veterans organizations agree with you. this should be an opportunity for all americans to come together and show the world we're committed to ensuring the basic human dignity
a tendency to destroy their civil and their political righ rights. to be more safe they, at length, become willing to run the risk of being less free." our nation's founders warned us about the grave danger of sacrificing our most basic liberties in the pursuit of security -- security at all costs. they provided us with the constitution framed to prevent precisely such a tragic outcome. i urge my colleagues to vote in favor of the feinstein-lee amendment and against the mistaken idea that the government may detain american persons indefinitely without charge and without trial. thank you, mr. president. i yield back the rest of my time to senator feinstein. mrs. feinstein: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from california. mrs. feinstein: mr. president, the amendment before you is cosponsored by the distinguished senator who just spoke, senator lee, senator coons, collins, paul, lautenberg, gillibrand, kirk, tester, johnson, sanders, whitehouse, heller, baucus, demint, webb, klobuchar, bingaman, rockefeller, begich, boxer, and a -- an amendment somewhat similar to this, all
a great night. we'll see you right back here tomorrow. ♪ lou: the obama administration tonight ramping up diplomatic efforts to end seer -- syria's bloody civil war and the fear assad could use chemical weapons against his own people. the military is prepared to use poisen gas bombs, secretary of hillary clinton flew to dublin to hold a meeting with her russian counter part and u.n. enjoy to syria meeting to discuss how they would end the now 21-month long conflict in syria and how to move assad from power. and there's no sign they had to reverse the support, and today, a senior lawmaker says the syria government is now incapable of functioning properly. just before the meeting with the russian foreign minister, secretary clinton insisted that the united states and russia share common goals in the region. >> trying hard to work hard with russia to stop the bloodshed in syria and begin a political transition to a post asad future. the pressure against the regime in and around damascus seems to be increasing. lou: at home, leon pa net fa issuing the -- panetta issuing the sharpest warning y
-span: what was custer's luck? >> guest: custer's luck was an expression that people made up during the civil war to explain his incredibly fast rise to prominence, that he was always in the right place at the right time. it seems to me that you have to give custer credit for more than this. he was in the right place at the right time, but he knew how to make the most of those opportunities which many people would not. i think, for example, of what happened to another man who was appointed brigadier general at the same time that custer was, elon farnsworth. both of them became generals right before the battle of gettysburg. both were under the command of general judson kilpatrick, whose nickname was "kill cavalry" because he was so reckless with the men under his command. custer managed to somehow get his orders from kilpatrick countermanded by another general, and as a result, he played a significant part in the battle of gettysburg. when pickett was charging against the union front, stuart was coming around the rear with the idea that they would cut the union forces in half. custer actually
of the assad regime. he thinks he can get away with it. he believes he's lost anyway because the civil war engulfed his regime and the rebels have been on the march the last several months. >> we'll be right back with red light cameras. are they legal? citracal slow release continuously releases calcium plus d with efficient absorption in one daily dose. citracal slow release. ♪ [ male announcer ] campbell's green bean casserole. it's amazing what soup can do megyn: a major class action lawsuit over red light cameras. this new lawsuit alleges cameras are actually rigged to booths payoff for the ticket collectors. trace gallagher has more on that. >> reporter: it's a cash cow for new york city. $293 million in the past five years alone. the reason new york is being sued is the drivers think the i is rigging them. federal law says the yellow lights at intersections where the speed olympic is 30-mile-an-hour has to be at least 3 seconds long. trim a seth sent out to engineers. they checked out a dozen lights and found all of the yellow lights were too short. some of them up to a half second
to this decendant of that legendary civilization. olympia is a true leader who has always devoted her considerable intellect, energy and commitment to doing what was right for maine and for america. olympia snowe has dedicated her life to public service. 18 years in the united states senate preceded by 16 representing maine's second congressional district, plus 5 in the maine legislature add up to a remarkable record of commitment to our nation and the great state of maine. but that span of nearly four decades tells us only part of the story. for olympia has truly set the gold standard for public service. from the statehouse to the u.s. capitol, olympia has built an outstanding reputation as an informed, thoughtful and effective legislator. she can always be counted on as a leader with integrity who pursued solutions and who had no interest in just scoring partisan political points. it is olympia's character that has made all that difference. mr. president, the private acts of public figures can tell you a lot about their character, so i want to share with my colleagues this morning a story about
and the politicians. it must promote high standards of journalism and protect both the public interest in the rights and liberties of individuals. it should set and enforce standards. here individual complaints and provide a fair, quick and inexpensive arbitration service to do with civil law claims. the chair and other members of the body must be independent and appointed by a figure and open process. it must comprise the majority of members who are independent of the press. it should not include any serving editor or politician. that could be readily achieved by an appointment panel, which could itself include a current editor with a substantial majority demonstrably independent of the press and the politicians. in the report, i explained you might be involved. although i make some recommendations in this area, it is absolutely not my role to seek to establish a new press standards code were to decide how an independent self regulatory body would go about his business. as to standards code, i recommend the involvement of an industry committee, which could include an involved serving editor's. that
Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)